Firefighting and Public Ministry: An Expanded Understanding of Vocation

July 18, 2016

In this episode Dr. Largen chats with Jono Adams, Seminary student and volunteer firefighter.  They discuss his sense of calling as a member of the Gettysburg Volunteer Fire Department, and how that enhances and expands his calling to public ministry.

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Is the Private Practice Physician a Dinosaur?

July 11, 2016

Recorded live at St. James Lutheran Church in Gettysburg, long time host, Dr. Gerald Christianson, talks with Dr. Elizabeth Wood, retired physician in private practice, about the decline of private practice in medicine.  Dr. Wood expresses concern that some important values are in danger of being lost: a single physician’s knowledge of the whole person; drug over-dose or contradicting prescriptions; lack of communication among specialists.  Much has been gained as well, but two universal issues remain open to debate: the delivery of quality care for all and end of life decisions.

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The Fourth of July, the Founding Fathers and the First Peoples of this Country

July 4, 2016

Think you know everything there is to know about the founding of this country?  Think again!  This year, to celebrate July 4th, listen to this fascinating conversation with Gettysburg College history professor Tim Shannon as he talks about the role of Native Americans during the Revolutionary War, and their varied relationships with the British, the French and the Colonists.  Don’t miss the discussion of Jefferson and his views of Native Americans.

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“Left Unsaid”: The Secret to the Longevity of our Constitution

July 4, 2016

Dr. Kenneth Mott, Professor of Political Science, Gettysburg College; author of “The Supreme Court and the Living Constitution” takes us on a tour of the U.S. Constitution.  In addition to a structure and a process for an American government, the Constitution assumes a distinction between permanent principles and occasional demands, between the “permanent” will of the people and the “whim” of frequent change. Thus what is left unsaid is the key to the endurance of the Constitution. The role of the Supreme Court becomes critical in keeping this dialogue alive and well.
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