Is the Private Practice Physician a Dinosaur?

July 11, 2016

Recorded live at St. James Lutheran Church in Gettysburg, long time host, Dr. Gerald Christianson, talks with Dr. Elizabeth Wood, retired physician in private practice, about the decline of private practice in medicine.  Dr. Wood expresses concern that some important values are in danger of being lost: a single physician’s knowledge of the whole person; drug over-dose or contradicting prescriptions; lack of communication among specialists.  Much has been gained as well, but two universal issues remain open to debate: the delivery of quality care for all and end of life decisions.

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Hand’s–on Social Justice

October 12, 2015
The Rev. Scott Schul, Pastor, Grace Lutheran Church, State College, PA; and chair of the Policy Council, Lutheran Advocacy Ministry in Pennsylvania, describes the work of LAMPA (Lutheran Advocacy Ministry in Pennsylvania), one of several state agencies that put into practice the Social Statements of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. 

LAMPA sets policy, organizes resources, and then advocates for that policy in the state legislature.  Two current involvements are opposition to same-day lending practices and promotion of nutrition in early education, especially breakfasts. 
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Encyclical on the Environment from Pope Francis

August 3, 2015

Dr. Collinge discusses the content and context of the encyclical, Laudato si, inspired by St. Francis of Assisi. It is a meditation on created nature and the place of humanity in it. The pope adds something new: he joins the Catholic theology of creation (not anthropology) with the tradition of Catholic social ethics, especially his concern for the poor. 

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Museums: Closets for America’s Keepsakes

July 20, 2015

Dr. Christianson asks Dr. Daryl Black, new President and Executive Director of the Gettysburg Seminary Ridge Museum, the question, “Why do we have museums and should they do more than just collect “keepsakes”? Dr. Black describes the change in museums over the past two decades from emphasizing a collection of items, e.g. rifles, to interpretation of these items in the wider context of the need for human beings to make meaning of the past.  He illustrates this with the conflicting ways North and South used the Bible and even viewed God in the Civil War.

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What’s the Future of Health Care in America?

June 22, 2015

Will Lane, Director of the Writing Center, Gettysburg College and former Chair, Adams-Hanover Health Care for All discusses the current status of healthcare in America with host Dr. Christianson.  Mr. Lane says the health care is slowly improving under The Affordable Care Act, but the goal is still to cover everyone with affordable health care. The obstacles today are political and not value or workable solutions.   Two models to meet the goal are regulated private companies and the expansion of Medicare for everyone. 

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Going Green

June 8, 2015

Dr. Christianson and John Spangler, Executive Assistant to the President for Communication and Planning and former President of the Seminary Ridge Historic Preservation Foundation, explore what we can learn from a small school on a large campus on how to realize a commitment to preserving the environment by “going green:” using new technologies, such as geothermal wells, measuring the “carbon footprint,” recycling, and planting.  The Historic Walking Pathway and campus renewal with new parking and tree planting are prime examples at Gettysburg Seminary. 

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“Race Matters”—Issues of Race, Culture and the Church

March 30, 2015

Dr. Largen speaks with The Rev. Dr. Martin Zimmann, Pastor, Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, Mechanicsburg, PA,  about the importance of talking about issues of race and culture in the church. Pastor Zimmann offers some helpful strategies for beginning the conversation.

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Making Aging an Adventure

September 15, 2014

Dr. Christianson talks to Stephen Niebler, Executive Director, Adams County Council for Aging about important issues around aging.  How to avoid family conflicts over the right to die as in the cases of Casey Kasem or Terri Schiavo. What to do when you suspect abuse of an older person-- financial, physical, or emotional. The most important local issues that impact on the aging:  transportation, housing, trying to understand complicated forms—in health, banking, Social Security, etc.

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What We Should Know about Argentina

July 7, 2014

Argentina beyond “Evita”: a bustling nation with a strong professional class, a varied economy (especially agriculture and manufacturing), and exceptional scenery. The younger generation, represented by this team Rotary International team made up of attorney Marinal Ramos, attorney Melisa Cruzat and business administrator Leandro Marquez, is fully aware of the troubles of the distant past but has only experienced democracy and an open society in which women are making themselves felt especially in the field of law.

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What We Should Know about Nicaragua

May 26, 2014

Dr. Christianson interviews Greg Bowles the On-Site Director of Project Gettysburg-Leon in Leon, Nicaragua.  They talk about how Nicaragua, the second poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere next to Haiti, is attempting to address issues of poverty, hunger, and land management.  The government is leading the way by making more animals available for farmers. Programs like Project Gettysburg-Leon are working to train local agricultural extension teams, as well as develop health, education, and art centers.

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